Everyone’s perception is more beautiful if they know they’re understood. This also applies, perhaps even more so, to babies. With our knowledge, we hope to show you the perception of your baby so that you know what is going on inside their little head and that they feel understood and appreciated. It provides your baby with the opportunity to develop in their own special way and to reach their true potential. It’s the foundation of a smart start for a happy beginning.

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What our users say?

Many people talk about the Wonder Weeks, leaps, fussy phases and ‘stormy periods’. Parents, bloggers and (online) magazines have written many articles, comments, reviews and stories about The Wonder Weeks book and app. We want to share them with you!

Our happy users from all categories:

Experts about The Wonder Weeks

van de Rijt and Plooij not only have they explained the periods of puzzling, difficult behavior in infancy which so worry parents, they have also shown how these behaviors mark developmental leaps and have described the stages in the infant’s understanding. What’s more, van de Rijt and Plooij have described the play and communication that work best with babies at different ages and thus helped parents understand and connect sensitively with their babies. This parent-child connection is the major prerequisite for the development of secure, well-adjusted children. The Wonder Weeks is essential reading for everyone who works with infants— pediatricians, social workers, psychologists, and, of course, parents.

John Richer, Ph.D., Dip. Clin. Psychol., consultant clinical psychologist and Head of Pediatric Psychology, Department of Pediatrics, John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, England

Anyone who deals with infants and young children will want to read ‘The Wonder Weeks.’ ‘The Wonder Weeks’ book will open parents’ eyes to aspects of their children’s growth, development, changing behavior, and emotional responsiveness that they might otherwise not notice or find puzzling and distressing.

Catherine Snow, Ph.D., Shattuck Professor of Education, Harvard Graduate School of Education

As a developmental educator and infant massage instructor, I work with preterm and sick babies and their families. The Wonder Weeks book has been an enormous support for the parents I work with, as it confirms that the fussy periods are ‘normal’ and not the fault of the baby or themselves. We always correct the baby’s age to their 40 week due date when using the book; I have even added another fussy period to my chart before that, at around 34-37 weeks gestation when preterm babies are often fussy or very sleepy due to this active period of brain activity. Frequently the fussy periods before a developmental leap can be misinterpreted and the behaviour blamed unfairly on the infant such as the baby being spoilt or manipulating. The mother is often blamed too, with comments about not having enough breast milk or holding the baby too much all of which, in my 30 years of experience, is rarely true. The consequence of such poor advice can be devastating for both parent and baby leading to breast feeding being not trusted and stopped or babies being left to fuss at the very time that they need extra support. In…

Cherry Bond RSCN, RGN, CIMI – Nurse, educator, author, Infant Massage Instructor, Brazelton Assessor, Doula and grandparent.

I’ve got ‘The Wonder Weeks’ and refer to it constantly. It’s not just the odd day though, or even the odd group of days, its been every single day since he was born, he will go to other people once he knows them, but I still have to be in eye sight, and the sleeping thing is crazy, I can’t even nurse him off to sleep and then sneak out off the room, its like he feels the pressure change on the mattress and instantly wakes.

Moderator – BundleJungle.com

I highly recommend the book, ‘The Wonder Weeks’ as they all really do go through extra clingy phases when going through developmental changes. If I recall, around now give or take a couple weeks they go through a stage of separation anxiety as developmentally they’ve realized that you’re capable of moving away from them and that the distance between you is out of their control. I’d love to go into it more but I’m sneaking in some online time while feeding the monkey in between packing for holidays!…

Petra, Boston – via BundleJungle.com

Ask Moxie is a HUGE proponent of your book, that’s how most people probably learned of it. At least I did, almost 3 years ago and waited for it to be back in print. I LOVE it!…

Stacy Rodes Meyers – Founder, BestMilkBistro.com

We’ve found ‘THE’ must have gift for all parent’s to be! ‘The Wonder Weeks – How to stimulate your baby’s mental development and help them turn their 10 predictable, great, fussy phases into magical leaps forward’!…

Adelaide Chummy Mummy’ and Tot Shop

The Wonder Weeks’ is a great book for new parents! It takes you step by step through the first two years of life and helps explain out those mysterious times in your child’s life where you think your fabulously well behaved child has suddenly become possessed… I can’t wait to get my hands on an updated copy of this book, because I think the insights will be invaluable in terms of being prepared and navigating the independence stage in a positive way!…

Heather – actingbalanced.com

The Wonder Weeks – a look at cognitive growth in the first year – why might the baby be fussy, and what can parents do.

Carolyn Hax – The Washington Post Writers’ Group, Facebook followers.

This is a very practical and entertaining window into the baby’s first year and a half. van de Rijt and Plooij have observed and found the vulnerable times in an infant’s development that I independently came to in my book Touchpoints (Perseus). The authors’ observations and practical suggestions are wonderful.

T. Berry Brazelton, M.D., professor emeritus, Harvard Medical School

Terrible Twos’ a Misnomer, According to Research; Extended Edition of International Bestseller Released, Helps Parents Weather Emotional Storms. Research shows that the so-called ‘terrible twos’ don’t need to exist when it comes to child development. In fact, the behavior often associated with this stage – tantrums, moodiness, nagging and an affinity for the word ‘no’ – begins shortly after the first birthday. For parents, it is important to jump into action at this point so they can prevent the ‘two’s’ from becoming terrible and turn them into something tremendous. A child doesn’t need to act so ‘terrible,’ as long as you know what to do and, more important, why he is acting this way. By understanding these leaps you can make the transition into toddlerhood, and the subsequent stages including the ‘terrible two’s,’ into the ‘tremendous two’s’ and beyond. ‘Tremendous,’ says Dr. Plooij, ‘because it is with these leaps that a huge part of socialization is set for life. And tremendous: because good values and norms start now. If you invest in your toddler in this time, it will pay off for lifetime and especially in puberty.

San Francisco Chronicle

van de Rijt and Plooij will help you see the world the way an infant sees it. As the child grows, displays of emotion (such as crying) tell us the child is summoning reserves of energy and is calling out for help in finding new ways to perceive the changing world. Because van de Rijt and Plooij have discovered predictable stages in the widening of the infant’s perceptions and skills, they can enable you, with their superb examples, to recognize the onset of these stressful episodes and to join your child in coping with them. So rich, indeed, are the implications of finding new perceptions and new skills in the midst of stress that whether or not you are a parent, it can never be too early or too late to profit from this book.

Philip J. Runkel
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